Founded 1946, by Geoffrey Beard

Stourbridge Historical Society

The son of Clive of India, Edward, made further additions to Walcot, including this courtyard and seperate ballroom.


Today this ballroom is in constant use for wedding receptions. 

The side of the ballroom (shown here) leads on to the extensive gardens and arboretum, which members were free to enjoy after a most welcome cup of tea and cake served in the ballroom.

Edward also created an arboretum at the rear of the house which today is an upmarket glamping venue with accomodation available in a  shepherds hut, a fire engine, a showman's wagon and a chapel (shown here), to name but a few. 

This corrugated iron chapel was built for elderly worshippers in Muxton, Shropshire in 1894, and fell out of use after 103 years and was bought by Robin Parish and transported to Walcot.

The society would like to thank Robert and Lucinda for allowing us to visit their home.


Thanks to Gill, our outings secretary, for all her work in finding such an interesting house to  visit, and congratulations on organising such good weather! 


Photographs were provided by our in house photographer Graham Beckley.

On July 4th 28 members travelled to Shropshire to visit Walcot Hall, once the home of Clive of India (also, for a short period, home to the two sons of well known Stourbridge benefactors, Ernie & Mary Stevens).

This portrait hanging in the main hall is of Clive of India, who commissioned Sir William Chambers to create a stately Georgian Mansion between 1763-1767.


Today the Hall is used mainly for wedding ceremonies,the Bride making her entrance down the grand staircase into the hall.

More of Robert's collections can be seen in the hallway leading to his study.

The portrait seen at the far end of the hallway shows Robert's grandfather. 

Arthur, the eldest son of the present owners, Robert and Lucinda Parish, is seen here welcoming the group to Walcot. In the background is the large lake which we were told was excavated by French P.O.W.s.

The present owner, Robert Parish, is a self confessed collector and inveterate hoarder, as is obvious in this photograph of his study.